APPLY FOR THE 2016 FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMME

Tatua Kenya’s work is informed by the mass inequality in the lack of availability and access to basic social services among the poor and marginalized. While a lot of what we see as poverty is systemic and a result of the world’s dysfunctional unequal distribution of resources, we at Tatua see the continued negligence of leaders with authority and responsibility over public resources to fix and align such resources to serve by bridging these gaps in urban, peru-urban and rural areas

Many poor and marginalized communities have not been able to secure long term solution to the dynamic that comes with such inequalities. More often than not, such communities have left such development works to social based institutions and other external players who have stepped to support by providing for basic social .Although this trend has provided short time relief, it has not yielded any long term solution to the challenges our communities are facing. It instead has led to projects being initiated in the community that are externally motivated and lack local ownership, drive and leadership sensitive to the community’s needs, project that die immediately their sponsors are out and has rendered the communities with the feeling of incapability and dependency. We therefore believe that such communities need to raise their voice through tangible collective actions in their respective areas and demand of such mistakes to be corrected for good.

When such communities adopt the concept of grass root leadership to build strong social movements then the world begin to sense the shift on power dynamics that settles inequality at local, national and global levels. Tatua Kenya believes that the answer lies with the communities. That for real change to be realized, the capacity and agency of the challenged community has to be build and channeled purposefully. When that happens, communities regarded as poor writes a new story – all children attending school, clean and secure streets, access to basic healthcare and every home having food for their children after school. Tatua Kenya exists to expose the power of the challenged communities by organizing their strengths to create a powerful force of change.  More to that, communities working with Tatua fellows benefits through platforms that unite, build meaningful relationship and inculcate agency to attain social change using their resources. Fellows who join the fellowship will lead their communities through a 6moth of campaigns that spark a beginning of dignity and hope.

The Fellowship program is a 6month course where community leaders (fellow in this case) learn, adapt and apply effective community organizing and engagement methodology. These practices have been tried and proven to work within various contexts with reasonable adaptation of the teaching. Community leaders’ sign up to the fellowship program to create a community led movement addressing a priority social issue.  The materials are developed by a network of resources including Marshal Ganz of Harvard Kennedy School of Government, the Greensboro School of Servant Leadership, The New Organizing Institute and Episcopal Service Corps to build structures that allow their communities to lead social change with their resources.

A brief of the fellowship’s Expected Activities.

Month Activities
Pre-Fellowship Month Fellows get oriented to the program, are trained on how to share their stories, do community resource mapping ,conduct a listening project in their community and start building meaningful relationships.
1st and 2nd Month Fellows conduct community forums, do a collective decision with the community and prepare to elect a community leadership team to help lead the community movement.
3rd and 4th Month Training for the leadership team and campaign holds a community and celebrates the first peak of the campaign.
The 5th Month Strong leadership team implementing the strategy of the campaign, campaign achieves the 2nd peak of the campaign.
6th month Campaign achieves the goal and community holds a celebration. Tatua and Fellows evaluate the Fellowship and set next step on engagement.

F.A.Q.’s

Who should Apply

  • Organizations or individuals working with the community or desiring to work with the community around social justice issues i.e Resource allocation, education, Health , environment, child protection, or food security, or public participation on governance, access to clean water lead a campaign on social justice.

Are there charges for the fellowship/ what is a Fellowship Fund.

  • Tatua does not charge for the fellowship and no money is required for application, however, for this program to succeed it requires collective effort of everyone involved both Tatua and the fellow alike. In that regard, there exist a fellowship fund managed by both the fellows and Tatua team and caters for the immediate training and Fellows needs. The funds for the kitty are raised collectively by both the fellows and Tatua through the guidance of a coach at Tatua.

 What is a community led movement?

  • A community run movement is an initiative, led by local community members to create long-term change by using their own resources. The focus and tactics of those movements vary from communities and different strategies and actions to achieve change. This type of movement results in increased volunteerism, engagement and impact in the community.

What visible change will I be able to see as a result of the Fellowship program?

  • The Fellows develop as leaders and organizers who can work effectively with any community to run any campaign.
  • A committed community of people who agree to take a particular action of change.
  • A community movement that addresses a specific challenge with leaders who can start other movement to address social change going forward.
  • An indelible experience of real time leadership from on ground practice and coaching

How is Tatua Kenya committing to support fellows throughout the fellowship program?

  • Training the fellows on Effective Community Engagement and campaign Methodologies
  • Coaching the fellows regularly through their campaigns.
  • Guiding the fellows through the campaign process.
  • Offering spot training on community engagement methodology to fellows and their teams.
  • Measuring, evaluating and reporting the progress of the fellows to the organization.
  • Work together to design a training that encourages learning, adaptation and application of the methodology.
  • Creating a platform for the Fellows to network and build a community of support
  • Support in the fundraising for the Fellowship Fund
  • Connecting fellows to international network of community organizers

What is the expectation of the fellows in the fellowship program?

  • Commitment of 20hrs a week through (Fellowship is part time with a calendar that honors your other commitments)
  • Commitment to Tatua Values
  • Attending monthly training organized by Tatua Kenya or Tatua partners.
  • Attending bi-weekly coaching organized by the Tatua coaches or fellowship coaching group.
  • Contributing monthly writings and reflections for Tatua blogs.
  • Building a strong and independent leadership team in their communities.
  • Engaging their communities in the campaign.
  • Leading their communities to collectively taking action that symbolizes collective change with the help of coaches.
  • Leading their communities to achieve power over campaigns with the help of coaches.
  • Coaching community his/her leadership team.
  • Coaching next generation of Tatua fellows.
  • Proposing ways of how the Fellowship program can be improved.
  • Contributing in raising funds for the Fellowship Fund Kitty

 

What material will I learn as a Tatua Fellow?

  • Community organizing skills – Skills that enable the fellows to develop the capacity of their communities to make real change using their resources.
  • Servant Leadership – Practicing and developing servant leadership which focuses on service to the people.
  • Principles of Transformational change – Developing a project model which encourages lasting transformational change founded on justice rather than charity.
  • Financial Integrity- Cultivate the values and structure necessary to maintain financial integrity.
  • Listening Projects – Enable the fellow to listen and respond to the needs of the community.
  • Non Violent communication – skills for effective communication with team members and community members.
  • Open space facilitation – Leading a group of community members to make a decision
  • Effective facilitation of group meetings, and community forums
  • Leading the community through a collective decision making
  • Training for Trainers. – Develop skills that enable the fellows to teach material learnt in the fellowship.
  • Campaign Story, Strategy and Structure. – Developing a framework for the campaign that enables the fellows to launch and promote a focused community led movements.
  • The fellows as a result of on ground application of the skills will be able to start and run a people campaign on any issue.

Important Dates to Note

  • Short listing and notification of the interview date by 28th of October
  • One On One Interviews the week of 2nd to 6th November and the week of 9th to 13th November
  • Orientation day 18th of November
  • 2015 Fellowship Celebration 27th of November
  • Note: The date suggested above are fixed, kindly mark them on your calendar.

Follow or copy paste to your browser the Link below for an Application Form

https://tatuakenya.wordpress.com/apply-for-the-tatua-kenya-2015-fellowship-program/

Building the Community, Powering the Base

Since our launch, over three years ago, we have been dedicated to finding sustainable solutions to the systemic causes of poverty. That commitment is at the core of our vision of social justice; that commitment is why we are community organizers.

One of the core philosophies shared by the Tatua staff and fellows is the idea that social change should not and in fact, must not, be delayed by the unavailability of monetary resources. All too often, community leaders with a vision, find their dreams stalled when they are unable to find financial backing for their projects. However, if social change is about true liberation, we need to get rid of the idea that the first step in addressing a community problem is to look for external sources of funding. This is why for our fellows, and us, the most important part of any campaign is building a firm and committed base of supporters.

However, the reality is as long as Tatua does not charge for our services, we need to continue to come up with creative ways keep our movement running. Like many community organizers before us, we have often struggled with the question of how to achieve financial sustainability without compromising our commitment to the grassroots. The process of mobilization can be slow, and our fellows need our help to get their campaigns off the ground. But if we as an organization exclusively seek grant money to support them, we are failing to model grassroots resource mobilization for our fellows.

This dilemma led us to begin to question how we understood our relationship to fundraising, and more importantly, how we engage our own support base. Thus the idea of the #PowerTheBase was born.

Crowd funding is more than just about raising money. It is about bringing together the community of people who believe that the work you are doing is important, and having them say, “Yes, I want to be part of this work.” With a crowd funding campaign, every donor becomes committed to the work and accepts to share a vision for change. With each donor, we will not only energize and facilitate the work of our fellows, but we also solidify the base of our own community. The base that will be a part of building the movement that we envision.

Therefore, today we launch the #PowerTheBase campaign. We invite you to stand with us as we energize the grassroots. We invite you to join the movement for genuine social transformation. We invite you to #PowerTheBase.

Support our M-Changa campaign:

Make a donation on MPESA:
Go to MPESA
Select Lipa na M-PESA
Enter Paybill 891300 Account 4688

Make a donation on Airtel Money:
Go to Airtel Money
Select Make Payments, Pay Bill, Other
Business Name MCHANGA, Reference 4688

For our international supporters, you can donate on PayPal!  Power The Base (VibrantBlack)

Youth in Politics and Movement Building

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“How can we as youth hold each other accountable? How can we transform the dynamics of Kenyan politics?” These were some of the topics on the table at the Youth in Politics forum that we co-hosted with Fortitude Kenya on August 13th.

Campaigns' manager, Jacob Okumu, leading part of the meeting.
Campaigns’ manager, Jacob Okumu, leading part of the meeting.

Anyone who has been to a youth-targeted forum in Kenya will know that the amount of energy, passion, and anger expressed at these events leaves no doubt that a youth-led movement is on the horizon in Kenya. However, the central question becomes: how do we channel these feelings into sustainable systemic changes?

As one of the forum participants noted, it is not enough to simply have young people holding leadership positions; if young leaders are to transform the status quo in Kenya, then we must repair the opaque and self-serving systems that have corrupted Kenyan politics for decades. We can’t build youth power in isolation: we need it to exist in nurturing environments with transparent systems.

At this action-focused forum, we spent a lot of time discussing what key steps must be taken to realize these systemic changes. In addition to systemic reforms, civic education was noted as being the cornerstone of increased youth engagement: with a devolved government and a still relatively new constitution, Kenya remains in flux. Many still do not have a clear understanding of the responsibilities of various county as well as national offices, which makes it near impossible to hold elected officials accountable.

A key component in this is really interrogating what we mean when we call for increased youth participation in politics. Are we calling for the mobilization of an informed and active citizenry, or are we only calling for young leaders? Of course, effective youth mobilization would require both, but as one participant noted, being a leader and being a politician are not the same thing.

Building a strong young electorate requires that we constantly challenge ourselves as young people to think carefully about how we are building solidarity  across class and geography, and to ask if we are lifting up each others’ voices. It is not enough for urban youth to ‘educate’ rural youth. Or for wealthy youth to step into leadership on the back of their (likely) more extensive schooling. Instead, we must respect that all youth have valuable resources to bring to the change movement, and each of us must be ok with leading sometimes but being led at other times.

The group at work
The group at work

As the session concluded, we left feeling energized and excited to get to work.

The group agreed to reconvene on September 3rd to begin mapping a way forward. All are welcome to attend: call 0770357700 any weekday, for more information.